Category: "Miscellaneous"

Adolescents on the Internet: Issues in Intimacy By Michael F. Shaughnessy, Ph.D. & Russell Eisenman, Ph.D.

January 8th, 2009

Abstract

Adolescent intimacy has been investigated and theorized about in the past. However, at the present time, the Internet allows adolescents an opportunity to engage in interpersonal communication with adults and to "try out" mature intimate relationships with peers or older adults literally around the world. This paper examines the influence of the Internet on the intimacy development of adolescents and discusses concerns relative to intimacy, including positive and negative aspects, creativity, a case history of Billy, attachment, and more.

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Recovery Communities By Leonard A. Jason, Ph.D.

August 24th, 2008

You've probably never hear of an Oxford House, but 9,500 people live in
these recovery communities throughout the US. They represent one of the
largest self-help organizations in the world, and they are completely
self run with no professional staff. What's more is that they don't cost
society anything. Residents of each house obtain jobs, pay their bills,
and learn how to become responsible citizens for their families and
communities. It sounds too good, but it's true.

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The Myth of Intelligence by Henry D. Schlinger Ph.D.

October 1st, 2008

Abstract

Since the beginning of the 20th century, intelligence has been conceptualized
as a qualitatively unique faculty (or faculties) with a relatively fixed
quantity that individuals possess and that can be tested by conventional
intelligence tests. Despite the logical errors of reification and circular
reasoning involved in this essentialistic conceptualization, this view
of intelligence has persisted until the present, with psychologists still
debating how many and what types of intelligence there are. This paper
argues that a concept of intelligence as anything more than a label for
various behaviors in their contexts is a myth and that a truly scientific
understanding of the behaviors said to reflect intelligence can come only
from a functional analysis of those behaviors in the contexts in which
they are observed. A functional approach can lead to more productive methods
for measuring and teaching intelligent behavior.
Copyright Psychological Record Winter 2003

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